The Best Ways to Carry, Lift and Push Your Baby | Fit Pregnancy

The Best Ways to Carry, Lift and Push Your Baby

Baby your back after your bub arrives with these tips.

Breastfeed

If you’re sitting to nurse, think “straight and tall” and be vigilant about bringing your baby to your breast to avoid hunching forward. A nursing pillow can help raise her to breast level and offers much needed support for you. Alternate between nursing positions (football hold, side lying) to avoid overtaxing the same muscles. After putting her down, gently clasp your hands behind your head and pull your elbows back for 20 seconds to stretch your chest.

Push the stroller

A good rule of thumb to follow when adjusting stroller handle height: Put your hands on your hips. “Feel the two bony prominences in front. The stroller handle should be about that high,” Jaspers says.

Transfer the car seat

The middle of the back seat is the safest for your baby, but taking your baby and her seat in and out of the car is murder on your back.

It’s best to leave the seat in the vehicle and just tote your tot in and out, but if you want to carry her in the car seat, try this technique from Chicago firefighter and certified passenger safety technician Brooks Watson, co-founder of Safety Squad, a family safety consulting company:

-If entering the car from the right passenger side, open the door and place the car seat with your baby in it on the seat.

-Place your right foot on the floorboard and, keeping your knees soft, contract your abdominal muscles as you use both hands to lift the carrier and drop it into the base.

-Do the same during removal.

Once your baby weighs 15 pounds, Watson recommends leaving the car seat in its base and just taking your baby in and out.

Hold a diaper bag

Schlepping a bulky diaper bag around on one shoulder will overburden your arm, neck and back, throwing off your posture. Jaspers recommends a messenger-style bag to distribute weight more evenly across the body. If your diaper bag is loaded down with more than 25 pounds of baby gear, switch to a backpack style to prevent injury. If you must use a single-shoulder style, be sure to switch sides frequently and look for bags with minimal hardware, which adds weight.

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