1st Trimester | Fit Pregnancy

1st Trimester

Gluten-Free Cookie: Almond Crisps

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18 Bazillion Benefits of Exercise During Pregnancy

When your mom was pregnant with you, chances are, she wasn’t pedaling furiously at spin class or doing ball squats. Back then, doctors worried that exercise might harm the growing baby and discouraged pregnant women from breaking a sweat. Now, that’s completely passé. Researchers have realized that prenatal inactivity—not exercise—puts moms-to-be and their babies at risk. “For low-risk pregnancies, prenatal exercise is absolutely safe.

Can These Common Chemicals Cause Premature Birth?

You know to be wary of chemicals in your food and beauty products, especially during pregnancy. Now, a new study gives you more incentive: researchers found a connection between phthalates (chemicals used to make plastic more flexible, and as solvents in personal care products) and preterm deliveries.

6 Recipes for Healthier Cookies

Lime-Glazed Shortbread

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PB&J Thumbprints

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Working out While Pregnant

Working-out-While-Pregnant

 

I think it is great that you work out so often and are obviously committed to staying healthy and fit. Exercising during pregnancy can help relieve stress, fight gestational diabetes and may help you have an easier pregnancy and delivery. You can continue to work out as often as you do, but, if necessary, you should reduce the intensity level to the point that you’re able to carry on a conversation comfortably during your workout.

The 10 Essential Steps to a Healthy Pregnancy

1) PLAN AHEAD

“Start getting healthy even before you become pregnant,” advises Siobhan Dolan, M.D., M.P.H., medical adviser to the March of Dimes and professor of obstetrics and gynecology and women’s health at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center in New York. (Already pregnant?

A Pilates Workout for the Whole 9 Months

High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy: The Risk and the Fix

While you may think of high blood pressure as a problem for your parents or grandparents, many pregnant women experience blood-vessel problems that force the heart to work harder to pump blood to the placenta and maternal organs. In fact, up to 30 percent of first-time pregnancies are affected by hypertension, preeclampsia (high blood pressure plus protein in the urine) or eclampsia (high blood pressure, protein in the urine and seizures).

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