2nd Trimester | Fit Pregnancy

2nd Trimester

Cheddar and Chive Mini-Quiches

These adorable little “quiches” (really more like crust-less frittatas) are equally delicious cold, room temperature, or warmed! Perfect for an on-the-go breakfast or a protein snack, they can also be gussied up with fancier fillings--like gruyere, asparagus or bacon--and served at brunch parties.  The recipe doubles easily and also freezes exceptionally well—just warm the quiches a bit after freezing to eliminate any “freezer” taste. 

The Workout That Makes Your Baby Smarter

You know that exercising during pregnancy manages your mood, dials down discomfort, and reduces your risk of gestational diabetes. But it might also help your baby’s brain develop faster, according to new findings presented recently in San Diego at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience.

Squash, Chicken and Kale Pizza

A winter squash spread replaces tomato sauce and packs vitamin A to help boost your immune system during pregnancy. Kale adds vitamin C, which aids in the development of your baby’s brain. Related: Your Guide to Healthier Pizza (3 More Recipes)

Rock-n-Roll Names for Baby Boys

While you may really like traditional (and popular) baby boy names like Jacob and Michael, you’d really prefer to bestow a name that is a bit more unique, and something that suits your own personal sense of style.

More Ways You Could be Using Greek Yogurt

Some foods are so flexible and multi-purpose they’re perfect to keep on hand every day. But “staple” is almost too small a word for the amazing versatility that is Greek yogurt. For starters, there’s the creamy texture and rich taste.

Greek yogurt is also a pre- and postnatal nutrition slam dunk: The low-fat variety clocks in at 170 calories, 23 grams of protein and a whopping 25% of most women’s daily calcium requirements for one cup. 

Quinoa Edamame Salad

The amino acids in protein are the building blocks of all of your and your baby’s cells. It’s especially important to get enough of the macronutrient in the second and third trimesters. In fact, not consuming enough protein in your final two trimesters could increase the risk for low birth weight, which can put your baby at greater risk for high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease later in life. Great sources of protein include: edamame, meat, poultry, legumes (beans and peas), tofu, eggs, nuts and seeds, milk, Greek yogurt, and the versatile grain used in this recipe--quinoa.

The Simple Way to Keep Your Weight in Check

Struggling to get in a proper prenatal workout? The good news: Moving frequently all day long may be more beneficial for you during pregnancy than a 30-minute trip to the gym during an otherwise sedentary day.

Is Soy Safe During Pregnancy?

The relationship between science and soy has been a tumultuous one. It seems like as soon as research suggests that eating soy can help prevent disease, a newer study refutes its findings.

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