2nd Trimester | Fit Pregnancy

2nd Trimester

The Lowdown On Hand-Me-Downs

A friend offers you the car seat her son has outgrown. Should you accept it?

Probably not, unless the seat is almost new and you are certain it has never been in an accident or subject to a recall.

Just Give Me A List

“Do you like the espresso diaper bag with the tangerine piping or the black bag with the copper trim? And what do you think of the inflatable breastfeeding pillow compared with the foam one?” During my pregnancy, I got emails like this every day—from my husband, Paul. In charge of our baby registry, he spent hours online researching the merits of audio versus video baby monitors. I found the world of baby paraphernalia daunting, but Paul transferred his passion for sports gear to an obsession with baby stuff.

Nutrition During Pregnancy: 10 Do's and Don'ts

When I ordered shrimp rolls at a tapas bar 12 weeks into my pregnancy, one of my friends reacted as if I’d ordered a double martini. “You can’t have shrimp when you’re pregnant!” she insisted. When I asked her why not, all she could offer was, “Well, I’m not sure, but I know you can’t.” Turns out, she was mistaken (phew! I ordered the shrimp anyway), a common phenomenon when it comes to prenatal nutrition.

Hormone Handbook

During pregnancy, many of the changes you’re going through are visible—your growing breasts and belly are the most obvious. Others, like a powerful urge to “nest,” you can’t see but can certainly feel. A great number of these changes are due to hormones, powerful chemicals that affect your mind, your body and your pregnancy. Here’s a guide to some of the most important players.

The Dirt on Bacteria

Most of the bacteria we encounter do no harm. Many do quite a bit of good. But moms-to-be are often certain that all bacteria are out to get them, thanks to a few bad players like Listeria monocytogenes, sometimes found in unpasteurized soft cheeses, and Salmonella, a potential hazard when meat and eggs are undercooked.

Pregnancy Diet: 10 Rules To Eat By

You are what you eat. That’s old news. So is the fact that your diet during pregnancy affects your newborn’s health. But the new news is that what you eat in the next nine months can impact your baby’s health, as well as your own, for decades to come. Here are 10 easy nutrition rules that will benefit you both.

Firming Cream

Firming-Cream


“While most such creams don’t contain any ingredients that will hurt you or your baby, they won’t help much, either,” says Ava Shamban, M.D., a Santa Monica-based dermatologist. The caffeine found in most firming creams may create a temporary tightening effect, but you’re better off using a cream with emollients to soothe the itchiness caused by your rapidly expanding skin, says Shamban.

Varicose Veins

Varicose-Veins

During pregnancy, the weight of your developing baby can put pressure on the blood vessels in your pelvis. This causes blood to back up into the veins of the legs, enlarging them. Wearing support hose as well as getting regular exercise can help minimize the risk for developing varicose veins during pregnancy, says Macrene Alexiades, M.D., a dermatologist and assistant clinical professor at Yale University of Medicine. After delivery and once you finish breastfeeding, small spider veins can be treated by a dermatologist with a laser or injection procedure.

Womb With A View

Among the most memorable pregnancy moments are those when you see your developing baby on the ultrasound monitor. That flickering heartbeat! Those tiny fingers and toes! But ultrasound exams (aka sonograms) can also be mysterious and nerve-wracking.

The Myth Of The Placental Barrier

Tucked inside you like a walnut in its shell and cushioned by amniotic fluid, your baby seems safe and secure. Sure, the outside world is filled with environmental threats, but isn’t it the job of the placenta to filter out substances that can harm the fetus? Well, yes—but. While the placenta does a crackerjack job of screening most infectious agents—rubella and HIV are notable exceptions—it’s permeable to most pollutants, including pesticides, PCBs, perchlorate, bisphenol A (BPA), lead and mercury.

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