Birth | Fit Pregnancy

Birth

Will You Skype, or FaceTime, Your Birth?

If a loved one can’t be there when you deliver your baby, consider using Skype or FaceTime so he or she can share in your birth experience. To make sure the process goes smoothly, keep these apps and their features in mind: 

Skype: You can download Skype to an iPhone, iPad, iPad mini, PC, Mac, Android or Kindle Fire HD. Both parties will need a mobile device or computer with an internal camera or a web camera hooked up for video to work both ways on Skype. 

Just Push Play: Kreayshawn's Labor Playlist

From marathons to job interviews, you've used music to get pumped up before important events your whole life. Labor is no different.

“Music is super important—especially when you’re in a lot of pain,” says rapper Kreayshawn, mom of 6-month-old Desmond. “In the delivery room, music helped me keep my mind off of what was happening.” She shares the tunes that got her through labor day.

Get Off Your Back!

When Pamela Berens was a medical student in Minnesota, she learned that lying on your back with your feet in stirrups was not the only way to have a baby. “We saw a lot of Hmong women [from Southeast Asia], and many of them gave birth squatting in a corner of the hospital room,” recalls Berens, who’s now an OB-GYN at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston.

What's Pitocin Really Like?

What do you do if you won't go into labor or your labor has stalled? What do you do if your baby has decided never to be born? What if your water has been broken for 24 hours and you still haven't had a contraction? How about if you've been 5 cm for 8 hours and your doctor is talking Cesarean? What do you do? Sounds like it's time for some vitamin P. That's Pitocin—the synthetic version of oxytocin. Oxytocin is the hormone that runs around your body to make your uterus contract. Under ideal circumstances, you'll make enough to squirt that baby out on your own.

Prevention of a Premature Birth Starts Early

Most pregnant women assume their babies will arrive right around their due date, give or take a week or so. Although that’s usually the case, a growing number of babies are being born prematurely, at fewer than 37 weeks gestation. Between 1981 and 2001, there was a 27 percent increase, to about 476,000 births per year.  Currently, premature births in the United States account for 1 of every 8 births, according to the CDC.   
   

Bringing Baby Home

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If you deliver vaginally at 38 weeks-plus and your baby looks great and is nursing well--assuming you're breastfeeding--both of you can leave the hospital within six to 12 hours of delivery (depending on your hospital's policy and your own health, of course). One caveat: Since you probably won't have the benefit of a visit by the hospital's lactation consultant, I believe an early discharge mandates a follow-up house call by a consultant on the second or third day to make sure you and your baby are doing well.

Rooming In With a Newborn

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Hospitals function best on routines. However, it seems your hospital wants to take your baby and tabulate his "numbers" far too often. If you have a premature or sick baby, these interventions are necessary. If not, your baby is much better off in your room, being held in your arms and nursing often. Healthy full-term babies almost never need to go to a nursery and can stay with their parents 24 hours a day.

Umbilical Cord Clamping

Umbilical-Cord-Clamping

Research shows that routine clamping of the umbilical cord immediately after birth, rather than waiting for the cord to stop pulsating, deprives the baby of red blood cells and iron stores. A literature review in the Journal of Midwifery and Women's Health looked at nine studies that had been done over the past 20 years. This research suggested that immediate clamping may reduce the amount of red blood cells a baby receives by 50 percent.

Real Life Stories: Home Births

"I was happy to be in my own bed. But let's face it: Birth without drugs sucks." —Mardi Douglass, Seattle

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