Baby Sleep | Fit Pregnancy

Baby Sleep

Ease Baby's Cold and Sneezes

Just like us humans, cold viruses are indoors this time of year instead of chilling outside, so they get lots of opportunities to infect us. Infants are especially susceptible to the common cold because they haven’t developed resistance to most of the viruses that cause them. That’s why the most recommended cold-prevention strategy—washing hands frequently—is especially important for anyone handling your baby, says Kenneth E. Katz, M.D., a pediatrician in Littleton, Colo.

The Best Baby Gear: On a Budget

The Best Baby Gear: Moderately Priced

Crib Safety: 6 Tips to Use Now

An average of 26 children suffer a crib-related injury every day in the U.S. Follow these tips to keep your baby safe and sound:

Get a Crib with Fixed Sides. 
If you’re considering buying a secondhand crib be aware that safety standards issued by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) in 2011 prohibit the sale of drop-side cribs. Their use has been blamed for 32 deaths in the past decade, mostly because they’ve led to suffocation and strangulation.

39 Weeks: Waiting for Baby

I’m 39 weeks and 4 days pregnant, and the suspense over having to wait even another day to see my son’s little face and hold him in my arms is making me seriously restless.

Growing Battle Over Swaddling

There is a battle brewing about a staple in parents' baby-care arsenals: swaddling.

Just Had a Baby? A Six-Week Survival Guide

This postpartum survival guide culls our favorite experts' tried-and-true tips about how to make the best of this challenging rite of passage.

Here's what you'll need to know:

Brace Yourself
At the hospital, your baby is examined by the pediatrician, who will explain to you any obvious curiosities (for example, birthmarks or a pointy head shape).

After you get home, however, your baby may produce some unexpected sights and sounds; most are normal.

Safe Sleep

Here’s the good news: Ever since the 1994 launch of the Back to Sleep campaign, which instructs parents to put infants to sleep on their backs, the number of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) cases has decreased by more than 50 percent. The bad news is that SIDS is still the leading cause of death in babies ages 1 month to 12 months, with more than 2,300 U.S. infants dying from SIDS every year.

Compassionate Sleep Training

A new study says it’s OK to let your baby cry it out so they’ll learn to sleep through the night.  After much debate about whether this particular sleep training technique causes children any long-term psychological harm, scientists tracked a group of kids up to age six and determined that, “nope…they’ll be just fine.” On the one hand, I’m very glad to hear that, because one of my daughters was an all-nighter who couldn’t sleep without lots of help and eventually, a couple days of cry-it-out-sleep training.

Sleep Deprived Mama

This week’s news about infant sleep training reminded me of my own sleep-deprived first year as a mom. My son was not a great sleeper. In fact, he was a terrible sleeper. I had heard from friends that the first few months were going to be rough, but the same people said, “But don’t worry, by three months he’ll sleep through the night.” Well, three months came and went and then four and then five.

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