Breast Pumps | Fit Pregnancy

Breast Pumps

Storing Breastmilk

Storing-Breastmilk

It's hard to believe that milk can stay out of the refrigerator and not go bad, but when it comes to breast milk, it's true. That's because mother's milk is an antibiotic of sorts, capable of killing many bacteria and viruses. That said, even though some experts say breast milk can be kept at normal room temperature for up to eight hours without the danger of bacterial growth, I'm not comfortable with leaving it unrefrigerated for more than four to six hours.

Your Pumping Problems, Solved

If you’re a new mom and nursing for the first time, pumping can seem downright daunting. But with a little planning and know-how, it’s easy to master the art of pumping—and to find the time to do it. Here, expert answers to the most common questions about expressing breast milk.

Related: 20 Breastfeeding Benefits for Mom and Baby

Express Yourself: The Basics of Pumping Breast Milk for Your Baby

When Jo Anderson became pregnant, she knew she wanted to breastfeed her baby for as long as possible, even after she went back to work. But when she returned to her job as a public relations executive, she found that continuing to breastfeed was more difficult than she had anticipated.

6 Common Breastfeeding Problems and How to Overcome Them

Whether you’re planning to, trying to or nursing your baby as you read this, we can all agree on one thing: Breastfeeding exclusively for six months—as recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)—is invaluable for the health of you and your baby.

According to the latest Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) stats, 74 percent of new moms agree and start out breastfeeding their babies. But, by the six-month mark, only 14 percent are still nursing exclusively.

A Shortage of Breast Pumps

A new health care law has unwittingly caused a nationwide shortage of breast pumps, the Washington Post reports.

How To Breastfeed When You Go Back to Work

Many moms think they have to throw in the breastfeeding towel when it’s time to return to work. Not so! With just a little planning and commitment, plus our step-by-step primer, you’ll be prepared to tackle the logistics of continued nursing.

Breastfeeding Guide For The Whole First Year

The first days and weeks of breastfeeding often boil down to sheer survival: getting your baby to latch onto (and stay on!) your breast; functioning on what often feels like mere minutes of sleep; and willing yourself to keep going if you’re having problems.

Yet at some point down the road, when you and your baby have made it through the getting-to-know-each-other period, you’re likely to have different questions and concerns.

Milk Duds

Honest women will tell you that breastfeeding can be challenging, especially at first. While 3 out of 4 new moms begin nursing after giving birth, about 67 percent are no longer exclusively breastfeeding at three months, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To help keep you on the good end of those statistics, here are some of the more common difficulties you might encounter, along with ways to overcome them.

Breastfeeding Solutions

This week I'm singing the praises of lactation consultants (LCs) and women who conquer breastfeeding hurdles in creative ways. These women (are there any guys who do this job?) are all about finding solutions to breastfeeding problems that might otherwise cause women to ditch breastfeeding and hit the bottle. LCs are breastfeeding specialists; usually (but not always) registered nurses and childbirth educators with extensive training and board certification. They're nursing women's "breast friends," working boob jobs to feed the masses. (Sorry, I had to get those puns off my chest).

Smart Breasts

Lesley caught that cold that's been going around—the really nasty one that's been laying everybody up in bed for days. She wrote wondering what she could take that would be safe while breastfeeding. She also wondered how long her breastmilk will last if she doesn't nurse for a couple of days. Wow, she must be sick if she can't even breastfeed. Poor Lesley. You can take ibuprofen and Tylenol for sure. Ask your pharmacist or doctor before you take anything else though.

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