C-Section | Fit Pregnancy

C-Section

Common Interventions During Labor and Delivery

You may be planning a natural birth, but there are times when your health-care provider must intervene for health and safety reasons. Or you may find that standard hospital practices often include medical interventions. In either situation, it’s important that you be involved in the decisions related to your care.  You can do that by asking questions and openly communicating your desires to everyone in attendance.

Placental Nightmares

The news story about Gina, the woman in Texas who survived a horrific delivery that required a 35-gallon blood transfusion, is getting a lot of well-deserved attention this week. This young mother had a troubled pregnancy from the start.

It's Complicated

Of the 4.2 million deliveries that took place in the United States in 2008, 94 percent involved a “complication,” according to a recent U.S. government report. Yikes, right? Not really, says Marjorie Greenfield, M.D., a professor of OB-GYN at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland. “Most ‘complications’ are irrelevant,” she says. “They have no impact on the health of the mother or the baby.” Here’s a look at the five most common potentially sticky scenarios.

{1} Umbilical cord issues

Turn, Baby, Turn

In the U.S. today, about 4 percent of babies are breech at full term, which means they’re in position to exit the uterus feet- or butt-first rather than headfirst. Before 1959, virtually all such babies were safely delivered vaginally; today, most are born by Cesarean section.

How Safe Is A Vaginal Birth For Twins?

Beth’s sister is pregnant with twins and wants a vaginal birth.  Beth says, “It seems like an uphill battle” because she has to labor in an operating room and have an epidural right from the start of labor.  Beth wants to know if delivering twins is riskier than delivering a single baby, if twins are more fragile and if all this OR the epidural business is really necessary. 

Too Late, Baby

Ask any mom whose pregnancy went into extra innings: Right around your due date, the phone calls, emails and texts start coming: “Is anything happening?” “What does the doctor say?” “Wellll????” Playing the waiting game during the last few weeks of pregnancy is hard, but it becomes especially difficult when 40 weeks turn into 41 . . . or 42. But the first thing to know is this: Your due date is just an estimate. In fact, only 5 percent of babies are born on theirs.

C-Section Rate Drops

After reaching record highs for almost a decade, the Cesarean section rate in the United States has dropped, The Associated Press reports. According to new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention figures, C-section rate was 32.8 percent in 2010—down slightly from 32.9 percent in 2009.

Oregon’s ‘Hard Stop’ On Early Inductions and C-Sections

Oregon, my home state, is being heralded as the latest state to take a hard line on out of control c-sections and inductions. Here’s what the headlines say:

Hospitals take 'hard stop' on early elective C-sections and inductions -
Oregon is the latest state where some hospitals are refusing to do the procedures before 39 weeks of pregnancy.

Oregon Plans Ban On C-Sections

Starting next week, many hospitals in Oregon will be taking a stand against early and elective Cesarean sections, MSNBC.com reports. C-sections have become commonplace, and federal statistics now show that surgical deliveries account for more than 30 percent of all U.S. deliveries.

Herpes and Delivery

Herpes-and-Delivery

Knowing your herpes simplex virus status makes you better prepared to deal with it. Many cases of neonatal transmission occur with mothers who don’t know they have the virus. Fortunately, while roughly 25 percent to 30 percent of pregnant women have herpes, less than 0.1 percent of babies contract it. Risk is increased if a woman has an outbreak at the time of delivery, because active viral cells present in the vagina can be very dangerous for her baby.

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