Dr. Oz | Fit Pregnancy

Dr. Oz

4 Questions to Ask Before Baby Comes

A lot of things will change once your baby arrives. You’ll feel zonked. You’ll spend a lot of time thinking about poop. And you’ll learn to dissect the nuances of a cry with the precision of sonar. Another big change: You’ll feel as if you have a meaningful conversation with your partner about once every two years.

Sleep Tips from Dr. Oz

If you haven’t already heard it, eventually someone is going to tell you to sleep all you can now because you won’t be getting any rest after your baby is born. Easier said than done, right?

Dr. Oz On The Just-Right Size Baby

When it comes to a baby’s growth in utero, we like the Goldilocks principle: Not too big, not too little, but just right. Neither end of the weight spectrum is optimal when it comes to development of the brain and body, and having a baby that’s either too heavy or too light is associated with many problems, both during pregnancy and beyond.

Pointers For Pops

A lot of expectant fathers think they have two jobs—you know, the one that begins the whole pregnancy process, and then the one that starts nine months later. But the reality is that even though moms are the supreme bearers of physical responsibility during pregnancy, men can play big roles, too. So print out this page and leave it on his nightstand. He won’t have to read your mind, and you won’t have to nag.

The Best Sex Positions for Pregnant Women

One minute, the sight of your partner makes you want to put him out with the weekly garbage; the next, you might want to play a couple of rounds of naked Twister. Par for the course during pregnancy.

See, as your estrogen and progesterone levels rise, they cause changes in your body that boost libido. Estrogen in particular, which serves such pregnancy-related functions as boosting blood flow to your uterus (and to your entire pelvis), also increases vaginal lubrication and heightens sensitivity in your breasts and nipples.

Hormone Handbook

During pregnancy, many of the changes you’re going through are visible—your growing breasts and belly are the most obvious. Others, like a powerful urge to “nest,” you can’t see but can certainly feel. A great number of these changes are due to hormones, powerful chemicals that affect your mind, your body and your pregnancy. Here’s a guide to some of the most important players.

Have A Better Pregnancy

In a lot of ways, pregnancy is like standing at the edge of the Grand Canyon. On one hand, it’s the most breathtaking and majestic thing you’ve ever experienced. On the other, it’s a long way to the bottom—and you can’t help but feel a little anxious about taking a wrong step. Chances are everything will be just fine, and you should take comfort in the fact that statistics are in your favor. So we do want you to embrace the beautiful experience of pregnancy, but we also want you—as your child’s biological suit of armor—to do a few things that can help improve those odds.

Dr. Oz's New Weight-Loss Book

For some of us, the moment the baby weight starts to accumulate on our bodies, the scheming begins about how to drop the pounds once the little one arrives. After your baby is born and your days gradually begin to regain somewhat of a routine, it’s time to put your ideas into action.

Circumcisions, San Francisco and STDs

I caught a short segment on The Dr.

Your Body, Your Baby