First Trimester | Fit Pregnancy

First Trimester

Sports and Exercise

Sports-and-Exercise

That may depend on your exercise intensity and workout goals. As long as you have a low-risk pregnancy with no contraindications, such as high blood pressure or symptoms of premature labor, exercise is good for you, and aiming for a target heart rate can help you work out at an appropriate level. While the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that pregnant women use the "talk test" when exercising (if you can talk normally, your heart rate is acceptable), in 2002 Canadian experts suggested utilizing target heart rates.

Autism risk with older dads?

Autism-risk-with-older-dads

A recent Israeli study of more than 300,000 young adults showed that autism rates in the offspring of men who were 40 or older when their babies were conceived were almost six times that of the children of fathers 29 or younger. (The study found no link between autism and maternal age.) The researchers are now looking for reasons; there is speculation that sperm-producing cells spontaneously mutate as men age.

Much more study of paternal age is needed if we are to better understand its impact.

Seek help for excessive prenatal anxiety

Seek-help-for-excessive-prenatal-anxiety

Perhaps it can, according to two recent studies. A British survey of more than 14,000 moms found that babies born to women who were deemed clinically anxious during pregnancy were 40 percent more likely to have such sleep problems as trouble falling asleep or waking too early at 6, 18 and 30 months of age.

Checklist, Please!

Preconception Checklist
A healthy pregnancy starts long before you test positive. Here's a list of things to do before you conceive.

Pregnancy Checklist
What you need to do before baby, broken down by trimesters and weeks.

Pregnancy Checklist - What to do When Pregnant

To-Do

First Trimester

Week 1 If you haven't started already, you should be taking a prenatal multivitamin with folic acid daily (bump it up to 600 micrograms folic acid once you know for sure you're pregnant).

It's Easy Being Green

Q: Is mineral makeup safe?

A: Mineral makeup is a good choice during pregnancy, when skin may react unexpectedly, says Joanna Schlip, a Los Angeles makeup artist. That's because it doesn't contain ingredients that can irritate skin, such as fragrance or preservatives. Mineral makeup also contains titanium and zinc, which act as a natural SPF to protect your skin from the sun's harmful rays.


Q: Now that I'm pregnant, should I switch to organic skin-care products?

Your Worry List Is Shorter Than You Think

You may think the healthy pregnancy to-do list is like a potato-chip craving: never-ending. But it's not. Aside from eating well and exercising—two topics that are so important we've covered them elsewhere in this issue—there are only about five things you really need to do to increase your chance of having an enjoyable pregnancy and a healthy baby.

Watching The Weeks Go By

Week 4 Four weeks from the start of your last period, a positive test shows you're pregnant.

Week 5 Measured from crown of head to rump, your baby is about 0.4 inch long—the size of a green pea.

Week 8 The baby is about 1 inch long—the size of a large olive. His features are already distinctly human.

Week 10 Your doctor will probably want to see you between eight and 10 weeks for your first appointment. That's when you'll get to view the heartbeat via ultrasound.

Trimester One

So you're going to be a mom. The first 13 weeks are all about adjustment: You're getting used to the idea of that little being developing inside you, while your body is adapting to the demands of building that baby. No wonder you're so tired!

Feel Better Safely

It seems only fair that pregnancy should be accompanied by a nine-month reprieve from everyday pain and allergy symptoms, but as many an expectant hay-fever sufferer will tell you, that's just not the case. However, before reaching for your usual over-the-counter (OTC) medication or trying something new to help you feel better, consult our guide below and speak with your doctor.

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