First Trimester | Fit Pregnancy

First Trimester

Finding Folate

As a mom-to-be, you want to protect your baby from harm at all costs. Cut out alcohol? No problem. Stay away from raw fish? You bet. But safeguarding your baby isn’t all about what you “can’t” have or “shouldn’t” do. In the case of birth defects, it’s crucial that you add a key nutrient to your diet: folate.

What's Normal, What's Not (And When to Call Your OB)

Early in her pregnancy, Deborah Johnson (not her real name) started having on-and-off light bleeding. “At first I was really freaked out,” she recalls. “My immediate reaction was, ‘Oh, this can’t be good.’ ”

She called her doctor, who was concerned but calm. “She said she was going to play it safe by giving me progesterone, but that if the baby wasn’t meant to be, no amount of progesterone was going to make a difference,” Johnson says. Though the spotting continued throughout her entire first trimester, Johnson gave birth to a healthy baby boy six months later.

20 Reasons You'll Miss Being Pregnant

At some point in your life you’ve probably been reminded to “enjoy the journey.” That’s sage advice for most of life’s adventures, but it’s particularly true for the 40 miraculous weeks you’ll spend with your baby growing inside you. 

First Trimester Spotting, BV and Preterm Contractions

The most commonly asked questions I receive from readers are these three:

1.  I had some spotting after sex and I’m still in my first trimester.  Am I having a miscarriage?

2.  My doctor says I have Bacterial Vaginosis?  Will that make me infertile or miscarry?

The Feel-Great Workout

It’s one of life’s ironies: Getting off the couch for a little exercise can actually make you feel more relaxed. Plus, exercise can help reverse the sag in your energy level that can happen during pregnancy, and research shows that moderate exercise throughout those nine months can help you avoid excessive weight gain, lessen your risk for pregnancy complications and may even help you have an easier delivery.

Hide The Cheese

Hide-the-cheese

As long as your feta is made from pasteurized milk, feel free to eat as many Greek salads as you like. The concern is a condition called listeriosis, a bacterial infection that’s typically contracted through eating certain foods, including unpasteurized milk and cheeses, says Kelly Jackson, M.P.H., an epidemiologist with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Discharge - Worry And Reassurance

Every week I receive very similar emails from different women all over the world.  They all ask the same question about pinkish-brown discharge during the first trimester.  Very often, they notice the discharge the day after they’ve had sex.  Each one of these emails is tinged with worry about what that discharge means and fear that it might mean miscarriage.  The last few emails came from women in England, Alabama, San Francisco and Saudi Arabia, which just lets you know how un

Enriched and Famous

Fortified foods like vitamin D-enriched milk or calcium-added orange juice seem like an easy way to get the nutrients you need. But are they the best way to nourish you and your baby? The answer depends on the nutrient as well as the food it’s fortifying. “Adding nutrients can encourage people to look at a food as having a health halo when in reality it may be full of sodium, unhealthy fats or added sugars,” says Lisa Young, Ph.D., R.D., an adjunct professor of nutrition at New York University. Plus, too much of certain nutrients could cause unwanted side effects.

Liquid Assets

Amniotic fluid: It’s at once mundane and poetic, a humble liquid that protects and nourishes your baby. It also helps maintain a constant temperature; promotes growth and development of the fetus’s lungs, gastrointestinal system, muscles and bones; and prevents compression of the umbilical cord. Some studies even suggest that it transmits odors and flavors from your diet, helping to influence your baby’s future taste preferences.

OB or Midwife?

Eight years ago when I had my first son, I initially met with an OB-GYN recommended to me by a friend. I adored him—as well as his partners: a dynamic team of certified nurse-midwives. After learning that midwives tend to spend a lot of time with patients, have relatively few patients who require Cesarean sections and also encourage medication-free deliveries, I decided to have a midwife from the practice deliver my baby.

Page: