First Trimester | Fit Pregnancy

First Trimester

Old Wives Vs. Science

When it comes to pregnancy counsel, female family members, pregnant friends and even experienced moms don’t always know best. Yet many expectant women are more apt to listen to those sources than they are to follow medical advice, a 2010 study published in the Journal of Health Psychology found.

Pregnant Belly Basics

Inevitably someone will tell you (wrongly) that if you're carrying low you're having a boy, and vice versa. Here are some actual facts about baby bumps:

Miscarriage Demystified

For many women, the instant exultation that a positive pregnancy test evokes is slowly replaced with a nagging fear: What if something goes wrong? What if I lose the baby? While a certain number of pregnancies do, sadly, end in miscarriage, it’s reassuring to know that the majority of pregnancies result in healthy babies. And even if a woman does suffer a loss, she’s very likely to have a healthy pregnancy in the future.

Guide To Drinking Tea During Pregnancy

The ritual of making and drinking tea has been practiced for thousands of years, and for good reason. Tea contains polyphenols to protect your heart, antioxidants that may lower your risk of cancer and other nutrients that boost your immune system. When you’re expecting, the benefits get even better. A comforting cup may ease morning sickness, and even make for a shorter labor. However, some teas are potentially dangerous during pregnancy and should be avoided.

Finding Folate

As a mom-to-be, you want to protect your baby from harm at all costs. Cut out alcohol? No problem. Stay away from raw fish? You bet. But safeguarding your baby isn’t all about what you “can’t” have or “shouldn’t” do. In the case of birth defects, it’s crucial that you add a key nutrient to your diet: folate.

What's Normal, What's Not (And When to Call Your OB)

Early in her pregnancy, Deborah Johnson (not her real name) started having on-and-off light bleeding. “At first I was really freaked out,” she recalls. “My immediate reaction was, ‘Oh, this can’t be good.’ ”

She called her doctor, who was concerned but calm. “She said she was going to play it safe by giving me progesterone, but that if the baby wasn’t meant to be, no amount of progesterone was going to make a difference,” Johnson says. Though the spotting continued throughout her entire first trimester, Johnson gave birth to a healthy baby boy six months later.

20 Reasons You'll Miss Being Pregnant

At some point in your life you’ve probably been reminded to “enjoy the journey.” That’s sage advice for most of life’s adventures, but it’s particularly true for the 40 miraculous weeks you’ll spend with your baby growing inside you. 

First Trimester Spotting, BV and Preterm Contractions

The most commonly asked questions I receive from readers are these three:

1.  I had some spotting after sex and I’m still in my first trimester.  Am I having a miscarriage?

2.  My doctor says I have Bacterial Vaginosis?  Will that make me infertile or miscarry?

The Feel-Great Workout

It’s one of life’s ironies: Getting off the couch for a little exercise can actually make you feel more relaxed. Plus, exercise can help reverse the sag in your energy level that can happen during pregnancy, and research shows that moderate exercise throughout those nine months can help you avoid excessive weight gain, lessen your risk for pregnancy complications and may even help you have an easier delivery.

Hide The Cheese

Hide-the-cheese

As long as your feta is made from pasteurized milk, feel free to eat as many Greek salads as you like. The concern is a condition called listeriosis, a bacterial infection that’s typically contracted through eating certain foods, including unpasteurized milk and cheeses, says Kelly Jackson, M.P.H., an epidemiologist with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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