Foods To Avoid While Pregnant | Fit Pregnancy

Foods To Avoid While Pregnant

Hide the cheese

Hide-the-cheese

As long as your feta is made from pasteurized milk, feel free to eat as many Greek salads as you like. The concern is a condition called listeriosis, a bacterial infection that’s typically contracted through eating certain foods, including unpasteurized milk and cheeses, says Kelly Jackson, M.P.H., an epidemiologist with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Soy Safety

Soy has spent a lot of time in the spotlight in recent years, linked to lowering cholesterol levels and halting heart disease. The legume also packs a nutritional wallop during pregnancy. “Besides high-quality protein, soy is a great source of folate, iron, calcium, zinc and trace minerals,” says Elizabeth Somer, M.A., R.D. “Soybeans are also high in fiber, and they’re a source of omega-3 fatty acids.”

The Rules of the Game

(This is not a medically approved approach to prenatal nutrition, it's just what I've been doing!)

I came down with a stomach bug last week. First I figured it was morning sickness revisited. Then I realized it was something much more persistent and all over. Next I began to think back over my recent dietary missteps.

Food Facts

Before you were pregnant, you probably didn’t think twice about enjoying a tuna-fish sandwich, a salad sprinkled with blue cheese or a glass of red wine. After all, tuna is brimming with protein, blue cheese contains bone-building calcium, and red wine in moderation can benefit your heart. But now that you’re expecting, these foods could pose a health risk to you and your growing baby, which is why it’s important to know exactly which foods and beverages you should avoid.

Are You Food-Smart?

Congratulations! You’re pregnant. Now what? Do you get to eat everything in sight? Can certain foods harm your baby? We designed a quiz (with help from nutritionist Elizabeth M. Ward, M.S., R.D.) to test your prenatal-nutrition knowledge and help you find out what you and your baby need to stay healthy during the entire 40 weeks.

1) Your body will require additional calories to build that baby. But how many—and when?

Mercury Rising?

It's a conundrum: You know seafood is one of the healthiest foods you can eat. Rich in protein and other essential nutrients, swimming with heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids and low in saturated fats, these watery wonders have likely been a part of your weekly—if not daily—diet for years. But now that you're pregnant, you're being pummeled with news that fish may not be so healthy after all. What gives?

The Scoop on Fish and Mercury

Part of putting your Supermarket Smarts to work is to make informed choices when eating fish and seafood during pregnancy. Although you should limit or avoid eating certain types of fish during pregnancy, there are still plenty of healthful options in the seafood department. There you can find lean sources of protein and healthful omega-3 fatty acids.

Face-Off: Is It Safe to Eat Canned Tuna During Pregnancy?

YES, says obstetrician-gynecologist Karen Filkins, M.D., a fellow of the American College of Medical Geneticists and member of the Teratology Society.

Canned tuna is a higher-risk fish, but it's safe to eat as long as it is not your main source of food and is consumed in limited quantities. The risk of mercury is cumulative, so an occasional serving of tuna is not going to harm your baby.

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