Healthy Eating | Fit Pregnancy

Healthy Eating

How to Beat Winter Weight Gain

Developing borderline gestational diabetes turned out to be a blessing for Beth Bader. Though she had to pass on her favorite Christmas gingerbread cookies and limit herself to a bite of cake at her baby shower, monitoring her blood sugar taught her a healthier, more satisfying way of eating.

New Study Reignites Debate Over Pregnancy And Alcohol

Eat, drink and be pregnant? That's what new research from Denmark on alcohol and pregnancy is suggesting, Time magazine reports.

Nesting Recipe: Mango-Date Muesli with Almonds

Ours is a hopeful society. Wishful, really: take a look at the claims on our cereal boxes. I know a fair amount about nutrition, and yet, every few months I participate in the escapist activity of reading cereal boxes and purchasing an all-new, whole-grain, high-fiber, high-protein, lowfat, extra-crunchy, satisfying, fruit-filled breakfast illusion. Usually it’s sweet and weird tasting, with some very fibrous fiber bits lurking amongst the puffs and crackles.

Eating Tips For Nursing Moms

If you think that having delivered your little peanut means you can hop off the good-nutrition bandwagon, think again.

Even if you aren’t breastfeeding, you need a healthy diet to help repair your battered body—and if you are, it’s even more important to eat right. After all, don’t you want to make the best milk possible for your baby?

Comfort Zone

Let’s get real: When you’re pregnant in the dead of winter, controlling your weight is no piece of cake, although you’d probably like to eat one—and then another. We share our favorite recipes for comfort foods with a lighter twist to give you more energy and protect your and your developing baby’s health.

Amazing Grains

Whole grains may just be the holy grail of pregnancy foods.“The many varieties of whole grains are supercharged with vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants that offer benefits for both mom and baby,” says San Diego-based dietitian Wendy Bazilian, Dr.PH., R.D., author of The SuperFoodsRx Diet (Rodale). Plus, their complex carbohydrates help keep energy levels up throughout the day, she adds.

Enriched and Famous

Fortified foods like vitamin D-enriched milk or calcium-added orange juice seem like an easy way to get the nutrients you need. But are they the best way to nourish you and your baby? The answer depends on the nutrient as well as the food it’s fortifying. “Adding nutrients can encourage people to look at a food as having a health halo when in reality it may be full of sodium, unhealthy fats or added sugars,” says Lisa Young, Ph.D., R.D., an adjunct professor of nutrition at New York University. Plus, too much of certain nutrients could cause unwanted side effects.

Unearthed

Baby, It's cold outside. While winter may not be the season you associate with fresh produce, a bounty of unsung winter vegetables is increasingly available. “It’s important for a healthy pregnancy that you get all the vital nutrients found in vegetables year-round,” says Tara Gidus, M.S., R.D., an Orlando, Fla.-based dietitian and mother of two.

Get Your Snack On

As if being pregnant isn’t enough of a reason to celebrate, here’s another: You’re expected—and encouraged—to eat! Experts agree you need more calories, more often, as a mom-to-be. While it’s recommended that the average woman take in 2,000 calories each day, according to the Institute of Medicine (IOM), expectant moms need roughly 340 extra calories a day in the second trimester and 450 extra calories in the third trimester.

What to Bring a New Mom

When you are invited to visit a brand new baby, you bring food for the parents. It’s just…necessary. Every time I do it, I’m surprised by just how necessary. Parents of a newborn typically hand over the tiny new addition then fall on the food like starved wild animals, forgoing niceties like utensils or reheating. It reminds me every time that taking care of a week or two old baby is so all-consuming that you not only don’t have time to cook, you don’t have time to remember you’re hungry.

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