Induce Labor | Fit Pregnancy

Induce Labor

The Pros and Cons of Home Induction Methods

You patiently await your due date, eyeing it on your calendar and instructing loved ones to prepare for it days in advance. But when the date comes and goes with nary a contraction, you might be tempted to take matters into your own hands.

40 Weeks Pregnant and Counting

My son was born seven days past my due date, and I remember those last weeks as unceasingly uncomfortable, characterized by the sensation of a bowling ball bouncing on my cervix and the conviction that this baby was never going to be born.  All this, plus the perennial conversation starter: “No baby yet?” (The only appropriate response to which is to tear the speaker’s head off and the pickle it, because your stomach is too squished with baby to be able to really eat much.)

I remember being asked how far along I was and responding, miserably, truthfully, “Ten months.”

Ask The Labor Nurse: Is Pitocin Safe?

I’ve been on a toot for years about the overuse of Pitocin (aka oxytocin) for unnecessary inductions and augmentation of labor.  My concerns have focused on what it does to Mom’s labor and our ridiculous c-section rate, but also on how it has led to an outrageous number of babies being born accidentally premature.

Study Associates Pitocin Use With Adverse Effects on Infants’ Health

You probably know at least one mom who used Pitocin—a brand name for synthetic oxytocin —to induce or augment labor. But now, a new study has pregnant women concerned that the commonly used labor hormone could adversely affect their baby’s health.

4 Common Delivery Day Dilemmas

When it’s time to deliver your baby, you’ll want the most current information dictating how your OB-GYN or midwife handles your birth.

Most everyone agrees that evidence-based medicine, or practices shown in high-quality studies to be best for moms and babies, should rule in labor and delivery rooms.

Are You an Ideal Candidate for VBAC?

For a woman with a previous cesarean, answering these questions is a critical step to deciding between a repeat Cesarean (RCS) and a vaginal birth after Cesarean (VBAC).

Why 40 Weeks?

Why are babies born at around 40 weeks of gestation? Experts have long suggested that moms must pop by then, otherwise, the baby’s head would grow too large to traverse the birth canal.

Common Interventions During Labor and Delivery

You may be planning a natural birth, but there are times when your health-care provider must intervene for health and safety reasons. Or you may find that standard hospital practices often include medical interventions. In either situation, it’s important that you be involved in the decisions related to your care.  You can do that by asking questions and openly communicating your desires to everyone in attendance.

Elective Inductions

There’s an article in the news this week that absolutely breaks my heart.  A woman in Texas was induced at 38 weeks so her husband could meet his baby before he died.  It was their fifth child and he had cancer. After a successful vaginal birth, the dying man was able to hold his daughter a couple of times.  A few days after she was born, he slipped into a coma and died. 

Turn, Baby, Turn

In the U.S. today, about 4 percent of babies are breech at full term, which means they’re in position to exit the uterus feet- or butt-first rather than headfirst. Before 1959, virtually all such babies were safely delivered vaginally; today, most are born by Cesarean section.

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