Morning Sickness | Fit Pregnancy

Morning Sickness

A Bitter Pill?

A-Bitter-Pill

Perhaps. While "morning sickness" is most common in the first trimester, it can happen anytime during pregnancy. Prenatal vitamins may intensify your symptoms; if you suspect this is the case, try taking yours before going to bed to allow you to sleep through the discomfort. Using antacids also can be helpful, as can "grazing" on several small, healthy meals throughout the day. Additional vitamin B6 seems to curb nausea for some women; talk to your doctor about taking a supplement.


Morning Sickness: The Upside

Morning sickness can be miserable, but it may serve the valuable purpose of keeping your diet as healthy as possible for your growing baby.

A recent British study is the latest to contend that how much nausea a pregnant woman experiences may depend on how nutritiously she eats. University of Liverpool scientists analyzed 56 studies on morning sickness and found that symptoms were linked to higher intake of sugars, sweeteners, alcohol, caffeine and meat and to lower consumption of cereals.

Prenatal Problems

Most pregnancies are perfectly healthy, and moms-to-be glide through them with nothing more severe than a few bouts of nausea and the occasional backache. However, some women do develop more serious health problems that can threaten their own and their baby's well-being, sometimes even their lives. Don't worry—life-threatening complications are extremely rare. But it's important to know what signs and symptoms to look out for.

Here are some common pregnancy problems, along with information on their causes and treatments.

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