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Natural Birth

Midwives And Girls

It’s a big week for mothers, children and midwives.  That’s because two events are coinciding this week that celebrate girls and women:
 

Birth On The Big Screen

During last week’s Los Angeles Film Festival, I was invited to a pre-screening Q&A with filmmakers and working mamas Sara Lamm and Mary Wigmore, the duo behind Birth Story: Ina May Gaskin and The Farm Midwives.

Midwives: Starting a Trend & Saving the Birth Industry

A recent article in the New York Times claims midwives have become increasingly popular healthcare providers because they’re a status symbol.  Apparently, upper middle class women are no longer too posh to push.  Instead, they’re posh enough to take over the childbirth market with demands for personalized, family centered and wellness oriented prenatal, labor and delivery care.  Hallelujah!  If midwifery care has become the hottest trend, I say there’s hope for the American bir

Position Statement

Movement and positioning in labor work magic. Movement enhances comfort by stimulating the receptors in the brain that decrease pain perception. The result is that you are able to tolerate increasingly strong contractions. When contractions become very strong, endorphins are released and pain perception decreases even more. Ultimately, your movement in response to your contractions decreases pain and facilitates labor – a win-win. Movement also helps the baby move through the pelvis, and some positions enlarge pelvic diameters.

When OB And Midwife Team Up

Despite marked differences in their approach to childbirth, it's now clear that obstetricians and midwives working together can offer the best of both worlds.

The Road to Better Obstetric Care?

My friends and I watched Christy Turlington’s documentary, No Woman No Cry (about global maternal health conditions) with our plates loaded with olives and cheeses, macaroni and salads, cookies and berries.  We had so many choices it was almost impossible not to choose everything.

Spinals Versus Epidurals Versus Natural

Kim commented on a recent blog, “It was only during my pre-admittance paperwork appointment that I found out an epidural means a catheter is left in your spinal column/spinal membrane for the whole delivery.” The idea of a foreign object being attached to Kim’s spinal column “scares the bejeezus” out of her.  Kim, countless women share your sentiment.  

When Home Birth Doesn’t Work Out

Home births constitute about one percent of all deliveries in the US and a much higher percent in other parts of the world. That’s about 40,000 American babies born at home and doesn’t include mothers who planned on having a homebirth, but for one reason or another, ended up transferring to a hospital.  

Birthing Tips

1. Get to know yourself Think about what makes you tick and what you really want. Are you skeptical or respectful of the medical establishment? Ask yourself, if you had no constraints, how would you want to give birth? Does one option make you say: “Yes! That makes total sense!” Do others make you squirm and think: “Yikes! I would never do that in a million years.” Your gut reaction tells you which choice is right for you.

The Myth of the Perfect Birth

Childbirth has become super competitive.  I don’t know if this is new to the last 50 years or if women have always judged how and where they give birth as a measure of maternal perfection.  Maybe the Stone Age woman bragged her birth was better than some other cave woman’s birth because she pushed her little Neanderthal out on a rock; clearly making her more bad-ass, natural, and a better mother than those wimp moms who delivered in a cave. 

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