Newborn Baby | Fit Pregnancy

Newborn Baby

Blowing Raspberries

If you’re like most parents, you’re looking forward to your baby’s first words almost as much as you looked forward to his birth. Pay attention: An infant’s first communication starts much earlier than you may think—between the age of 2 months and 4 months.

Sleep Training, part three: The Compromise

Well, we gave it a good try. Nights regressed a bit since last week, and we let him cry again one night, but since then he’s gone down without any problem and slept like a log until 6 or so the next morning. He’s so sweet: I love watching him sleep now that he’s not swaddled. When he stirs he lifts his legs ALL the way up in the air, and flings his arms around, then lets them drop down oh-so-slowly.

Help The Hurt

When an infant needs a routine-but-painful medical procedure, such as a vaccination or blood draw, nobody’s happy. “It troubles parents, it stresses health care providers, and the adults transmit their anxiety to the baby,” says Neil Schechter, M.D., director of the Pain Relief Program at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center in Hartford. Happily, some simple techniques can reduce stress and tension for everyone without the need for medications.

Tracking Objects With The Eyes

Don’t expect your baby to be able to see much when she makes her arrival. “A newborn’s vision is very poor—between 20/200 and 20/400,” says Los Angeles pediatrician Cara Natterson, M.D., author of Your Newborn Head to Toe: Everything You Want to Know About Your Baby’s Health Through the First Year (Little, Brown and Co.).

Baby Those Teeth

By the time your child is 5, more than 30 percent of her classmates will have tooth decay, which can be well advanced even by age 3. “Early preventive care is the key to keeping your baby cavity-free,” says Elizabeth A. Shick, D.D.S., M.P.H., assistant professor of pediatric dentistry at the University of Colorado, Denver School of Dental Medicine.

A Poop Primer

New parents obsess over the contents of their babies’ diapers, but most of it is normal. In newborns, it can range from one thick, pale-yellow bowel movement per day to more liquid but grainy bright yellow squirts after each feeding, says Andy Clark, M.D., a pediatrics expert on JustAnswer.com. Here’s the first month’s poop scoop:

Tips From the Trenches

Here’s one part of new motherhood you might not have thought about: what to do if your baby poops in the tub. As unpleasant as the prospect may be, it’s wise to have a game plan, says Atlanta pediatrician Jennifer Shu, M.D. “It’s common for babies, especially newborns, to have a bowel movement in the bath,” she says. “The water is warm and soothing, which causes the intestinal muscles to relax.”

Clicks and Clunks

Clicks-and-Clunks

Those sounds are probably caused by sliding tendons, which happen when soft tissue (tendons) interacts with hard tissue (bones). It’s very common for a baby or toddler to make clicking and popping noises—similar to the sound of cracking one’s knuckles—in the spine and around the shoulders, knees and ankles.

ER How-To

 

Your newborn spikes a fever. Or, your 1-year-old wheezes heavily after tasting peanut butter. Suddenly, after a call to the pediatrician, you’re heading to the emergency room. It can be frightening, but there are ways to prepare, such as researching which local hospitals have urgent-care pediatricians on staff. Here’s what else to know before you go:

Getting There

First Vaccines

“From the time you are born, your body is bombarded with thousands of different microbes, some of which can cause illness,” says Jon S. Abramson, M.D., professor and chairman of pediatrics at Wake Forest University Health Sciences in Winston-Salem, N.C., and a member of the World Health Organization Strategic Advisory Group of Experts for Immunizations. “Vaccines protect infants from these serious diseases.”

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