Postpartum Depression | Fit Pregnancy

Postpartum Depression

Test Determines Postpartum Depression Risk

Until recently, postpartum depression (PPD) was rarely talked about, and the up to 19 percent of new moms who suffered from it did so in silence. But awareness of the disorder has been growing lately, with more research shedding light on its causes.

5 New Ways to Beat the Baby Blues

It’s no secret that becoming a new mom can be one of the most rewarding experiences in life—but it can also be one of the scariest and most stressful. “Motherhood is a major life transition, and you will feel the whole spectrum of human emotion from fear and loneliness to the heights of joy and love,” says Kayleigh Pleas, a wellness coach in New York City.

Feel (a Lot) Happier as a Mom

Terri Greenlee had just recovered from a C-section when she made her first venture out for groceries with her 8-week-old daughter, Emelie. In the checkout line, a grinning stranger tapped her on the shoulder with a mouthful of advice: “Enjoy this special time. It goes by so fast.” Greenlee wasn’t looking for a side of parenting advice to go with her pasta sauce—but there it was.

Should You Take Antidepressants for Postpartum Depression?

It’s not often you read good news about antidepressants and new motherhood, but here it is: the medication may help you stick with breastfeeding.

Don't Fear Delivery Day

Being a little frightened of pain during childbirth isn’t exactly a rare phenomenon. (You want another human to come out of where?!) But fear has its downsides, including an increased risk of postpartum depression, according to a new study published in BMJ Open.

Motherhood: 5 Ingenious Ways to Prep for the Role of a Lifetime

Few events in life are as unforgettable as having a baby. But there are plenty of other days after the Big Day that aren’t rosebuds and rainbows. Suddenly, you’re adjusting to less sleep, a changing body, and to being cooped up with a little bundle of … demands?

Related: The New Mom Survival Guide

5 Things You Need to Know About Postpartum Depression

It’s an almost inconceivable thought: being so depressed that you have no interest in, or are incapable of, caring for your baby. Yet it happens: Between 800,000 and 1 million women are diagnosed with postpartum depression (PPD) every year in the U.S.

Here’s what you need to know about this common, yet entirely treatable, condition.

Postpartum Bliss

It is surely a sign of enlightened parenting times that before I was even pregnant I had heard of things like nipple confusion, perineal massage, and postpartum depression. Not that I thought any of these things would apply to me.

The Difference Between the Baby Blues and Postpartum Depression

When TV personality/actress Vanessa Lachey revealed that she struggled with the “baby blues” after giving birth to her son Camden, a lot of people were confused — so much so that she issued a “clarification” a few days later:

Is Dad Stressed or Experiencing Paternal Postnatal Depression?

You’ve heard plenty of stories (among friends, on social media, or maybe even in celebrity tell-all books) of women experiencing postpartum depression. The postnatal depression you might not have heard about is PPND (paternal postnatal depression)—the one your partner may suffer from after your little bundle of joy arrives.