Pre-Pregnancy | Fit Pregnancy

Pre-Pregnancy

First Signs of Pregnancy - Early Symptoms of your First Trimester

Before my first pregnancy, I enjoyed a glass of wine with dinner and an occasional big, juicy chili dog. But even in those very first days after I conceived, the wine tasted flat and the hot dog repulsed me. Fast-forward a few weeks. With a positive pregnancy test in hand, I realized that my body knew I was pregnant before my mind did. Of course, the earliest symptoms of pregnancy wax and wane and are different for each woman; in fact, some women may experience (or notice) none of them. But several can crop up well before you even miss a period.

Getting Pregnant

Trying to get pregnant? Sure, it can be fun. But, it can also be a trying time if you don't conceive right away. Our guide to getting pregnant tells you what you need to know to maximize your chances of conceiving. Here, you'll find information on everything from preparing your body for pregnancy, to calculating your most fertile days, to the best foods to aid ovulation.

6 Ways To Get Ready

Ovulation Cycles

"Many women don't know the most fertile time in their menstrual cycle," says Victoria Jennings, Ph.D., director of Georgetown University's Institute for Reproductive Health. "Most think it's day 14, but ovulation doesn't always occur on the same day. It moves around, even in the same woman." Jennings says a normal woman's potential fertile days are days 8 through 19 of her cycle. (For a glow-in-the-dark bracelet to help you track when you're most fertile, go to cyclebeads.com.)

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

 Irritable-Bowel-Syndrome

Irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS, is caused by abnormal bowel motility, which means that its motion either is too fast or too slow. This results in bloating, painful cramping and episodes of both diarrhea and constipation. I prefer treating this condition with diet rather than drugs and recommend that you work with a gastroenterologist and perhaps a nutritionist to wean yourself from your medication before becoming pregnant. This may involve keeping a daily log of the foods you eat and noting those that cause discomfort so that you can avoid them.

Preconception Weight Loss

Preconception-Weight-Loss

Weight loss can decrease your risk of gestational diabetes. If you were in your 20s, I would recommend that you try to lose weight before getting pregnant again. But since you are 35, my recommendation is to not delay conception by trying to lose weight first, as fertility decreases with age. You should consider consulting a registered dietitian about beginning a preconception nutritional program, as doing so may reduce your risk. Thirty minutes of daily exercise also should be incorporated into your routine, as research shows it can greatly reduce gestational diabetes risk.

Multiple Miscarriages

Multiple-Miscarriages

Since you've experienced recurrent pregnancy loss--two or more consecutive miscarriages, most commonly in the first trimester--I'd suggest that you speak with your doctor about testing. If testing is indicated, an obstetrician is likely to first perform a karyotype, an evaluation of both partners' chromosomes, to determine if either of you has a genetic abnormality. If so, using a donor egg or sperm may circumvent the problem.

Joint Medications

Joint-Medications

No one really knows. While there is no evidence that these supplements cause problems for a woman or her baby during pregnancy, there has not been enough scientific research to tell us with any certainty that they are safe.

As an obstetrician, I advise all my patients to eat a healthy, well-balanced diet and to avoid taking any medications or supplements that are not absolutely necessary during pregnancy. But since I'm not familiar with the specifics of your joint health, you'll need to speak directly with your doctor about this issue.

IUI and Exercise

IUI-and-Exercise

There is no need to stop or limit your workouts while awaiting the happy news. In fact, the only precaution I recommend is that you lie still for 30 to 45 minutes immediately after your IUI to help increase the chances of insemination and to counteract any cramping you might have (cramping is normal after any uterine manipulation). After that, you're good to go.

OTC Acne Meds

OTC-Acne-Meds

I don't recommend using this product during pregnancy. Not enough studies have been done on salicylic acid (commonly known as aspirin) or hydroquinone to determine whether their topical use during pregnancy can harm a fetus. (Aspirin should never be taken orally during pregnancy because of potential risks to the fetus.) While not associated with risks to the fetus, the third ingredient, glycolic acid, can make your skin excessively dry, particularly during pregnancy. If acne continues to be a concern, speak with your doctor about a safe alternative to the cream you are using.

Fibroids

Fibroids

Probably not. Since your fibroid (a benign tumor) is asymptomatic, your doctor likely will choose to monitor it, rather than doing any type of intervention. The rule of thumb is to avoid treating a fibroid unless it is causing pain, unusually heavy periods or uncontrolled bleeding--or if it interferes with conception or causes miscarriage, both of which rarely occur. Because of your fibroid's size and location, it is not likely to impair your ability to conceive, the way a larger fibroid blocking a fallopian tube might.

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