Pregnancy Health Care Provider | Fit Pregnancy

Pregnancy Health Care Provider

Haggling for Maternity Healthcare

An article that posted in the New York Time’s Well column this week talks about what women without health insurance and those with policies that exclude maternal healthcare go through when trying to afford basic obstetric care.

I’m Pregnant! Now What?

After learning that you’re pregnant, your main agenda is simple: Tell your partner and celebrate! But once the happy news sinks in, the next steps can seem overwhelming. To help simplify the situation, we asked Akua Afriyie-Gray, M.D., an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Loyola Medical Center, for the most important moves a pregnant woman should make.

6 Tips for Effective Hospital Negotiations

Is the hospital you’ve chosen totally supportive of the six Lamaze Healthy Birth Practices

Once you educate yourself on the elements of a healthy birth, there may be times you need to advocate for yourself and your baby.

Hopefully you’re able to choose a birthplace that largely supports your goals for birth, but if that’s not possible, here are some suggestions that might make negotiating easier.

What’s The Answer to 70 Percent C-section Rates? Birth Centers

People are shocked—SHOCKED!—at the news in a recent study that spells out one of the glaring reasons why our Cesarean section rate is so ridiculously high. According to a new study conducted by the University of Minnesota's School of Public Health and published in the journal Health Affairs, C-section rates vary tenfold throughout the United States—ranging from 7.1 percent to 69.9 percent.

10 Questions to Help You Choose a Care Provider

Finding the right person to care for you and your baby during pregnancy, labor and birth is one of the most important decisions you will make, and it can help you feel confident to push for the safest, healthiest birth.

As you review doctors and midwives in your area, the following questions can help you find someone who will provide the care you are looking for. Asking questions and providing information builds trust, and it’s the best way to make sure everyone is working toward the same goal – the safest, healthiest birth possible for you and your baby.

If I Have an OB-GYN, Do I Need a Doula Too?

Having a doula is like having a personal trainer. You’re familiar with the equipment at the gym, but a trainer gives you the support you need to finish your workout. Your OB-GYN is usually there in the active part of labor and, obviously, during the delivery, but a doula will come to your home when labor starts and support you there as long as possible. Studies show that the more time a woman stays at home, the less chance of interventions. 

Ask Questions

Pregnancy is a time when you need advice and information from your doctor, and you’ll likely get it if you ask enough questions. But prenatal checkups can fly by so fast that you forget to ask. Or you may be too flustered to understand the answers.

“Many little things can get in the way of a woman communicating effectively with her obstetrician,” says Stephanie Teal, M.D., an OB-GYN at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. In fact, even the most self-confident expectant mom can use a few pointers on how to talk with her doc.

OBs and Midwives Working Together

When I found out I was pregnant, I chose my OB-GYN for two reasons: She came highly recommended and I had heard through other moms that she was supportive of natural childbirth.

The fact that she also shared her practice with a midwife didn’t play a part in my decision. At the time, I thought you only needed a midwife if you were having a home birth. I knew I was having my baby in a hospital, so what did I need a midwife for?

OB or Midwife?

Eight years ago when I had my first son, I initially met with an OB-GYN recommended to me by a friend. I adored him—as well as his partners: a dynamic team of certified nurse-midwives. After learning that midwives tend to spend a lot of time with patients, have relatively few patients who require Cesarean sections and also encourage medication-free deliveries, I decided to have a midwife from the practice deliver my baby.

The Road to Better Obstetric Care?

My friends and I watched Christy Turlington’s documentary, No Woman No Cry (about global maternal health conditions) with our plates loaded with olives and cheeses, macaroni and salads, cookies and berries.  We had so many choices it was almost impossible not to choose everything.

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