Prenatal Yoga | Fit Pregnancy

Prenatal Yoga

Prenatal Yoga: Cat/Cow Pose

See more poses in this series: Goddess Pose   |    Lunge Pose   |    Tree Pose  |   

Prenatal Yoga: Chest Opener

See more poses in this series: Goddess Pose   |    Lunge Pose   |    Tree Pose  |   

Prenatal Yoga: Ankle-to-Knee Hip Opener

See more poses in this series: Goddess Pose   |    Lunge Pose   |    Tree Pose  |   

Prenatal Yoga: Butterfly Pose

See more poses in this series: Goddess Pose   |    Lunge Pose   |    Tree Pose  |   

Prenatal Yoga: Child's Pose

See more poses in this series: Goddess Pose   |    Lunge Pose   |    Tree Pose  |   

Prenatal Yoga: Standing Flow Poses

See more poses in this series: Goddess Pose   |    Lunge Pose   |    Tree Pose  |   

Prenatal Yoga Pose: Sun Salutation

See more poses in this series: Goddess Pose   |    Lunge Pose   |    Tree Pose  |   

Lamaze Breathing: What You Need To Know

Once upon a time, the hallmark of Lamaze childbirth education was “breathing” (hee, hoo, hee, hoo). Over the years, Lamaze has evolved into a comprehensive approach to childbirth, part of which are comfort measures for labor; breathing is one of the suggested comfort measures. So what does it mean to “breathe?” Here’s a little on what you should know:

Breathing in Pregnancy:
A Daily Check-in

Prenatal Yoga for Real Life After Labor

If you haven’t already signed up for a prenatal yoga class, do it now.  Sure, you’ll benefit from the exercise as you strengthen your arms in downward dog and your legs in warrior pose.  You’ll absolutely use your yoga-based relaxation skills during labor (even if you’re getting an epidural), but the most valuable thing you’ll learn from yoga is to fully appreciate something you do 23,000 times per day –breathing. Taking a deep breath is among the most important parenting tools you’ll use.

The Feel-Great Workout

It’s one of life’s ironies: Getting off the couch for a little exercise can actually make you feel more relaxed. Plus, exercise can help reverse the sag in your energy level that can happen during pregnancy, and research shows that moderate exercise throughout those nine months can help you avoid excessive weight gain, lessen your risk for pregnancy complications and may even help you have an easier delivery.

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