Safe Exercise For Pregnancy | Fit Pregnancy

Safe Exercise For Pregnancy

Couch Potato Exercises

Couch-Potato-Exercises

Even if you have no favorite exercise from your past to offer inspiration, there's no time like the present to get off the couch and integrate motion into your life. Start by taking a 15- to 30-minute walk each day. If this sounds daunting, do what you need to make it a more attractive proposition--enlist a friend to join you or listen to a book on tape. If it still doesn't appeal to you, try swimming--it's one of the most beneficial activities for pregnant women. Also consider taking a prenatal exercise or yoga class.

Swimming

Swimming

While your aunt undoubtedly is thinking only of your best interests, swimming daily is a real gift to you and your unborn baby that poses no danger even as you approach your due date. If your water breaks while you are in the pool--or the bathtub, for that matter--you will feel the fluid leaking and should contact your doctor immediately. My real concern is that you take every precaution to steady yourself getting into and out of the pool or tub.

Pilates

Pilates

Pilates is a wonderful activity that you can continue throughout pregnancy with some modification. It offers gentle muscle strengthening while improving balance, which can be a real benefit as your body's shape and size evolves.

Sports and Exercise

Sports-and-Exercise

That may depend on your exercise intensity and workout goals. As long as you have a low-risk pregnancy with no contraindications, such as high blood pressure or symptoms of premature labor, exercise is good for you, and aiming for a target heart rate can help you work out at an appropriate level. While the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that pregnant women use the "talk test" when exercising (if you can talk normally, your heart rate is acceptable), in 2002 Canadian experts suggested utilizing target heart rates.

Fitpregnancy.com exclusive: Jessica's Workout

How the Fantastic One stays that way....

Actress Jessica Alba, appearing on the cover of Fit Pregnancy's June/July issue, was very close to delivering her first baby - and to her wedding with dad-to-be Cash Warren - when we spoke to her trainer, Ramona Braganza, creator of the "3-2-1 Workout." And Alba was still going strong. Here's how she stayed in such great shape before and during her pregnancy.

Gentle Exercise Best in First Trimester?

Moderate exercise is one of the best things a mom-to-be can do for herself. It's well known that regular leisure-time physical activity during pregnancy reduces the risk of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. But there may be one caveat. According to research on Danish women, strenuous exercise—especially intense, "jolting"-type activity—early in pregnancy may increase the risk of miscarriage.

The Power of the Belly

Can't get into a fitness groove now that you're pregnant? Then it's time to belly up, say sisters Neena & Veena, creators of several Bellytwins DVDs, including "Bellydance Core Conditioning" and the forthcoming "Belly Baby Prenatal Workout."

"In ancient history, belly dancing was always known as a preparation for childbirth," says Neena, who recently delivered her first child via water birth. The moves require squeezing and releasing the pelvic muscles to create the ripple effect as well as doing figure 8s with the hips.

Work out with Gabby

Pregnancies don't get more fit than this! In the February/March issue of FitPregnancy, professional volleyball player and mother Gabrielle Reece shares her tips on how she stayed fit through both of her pregnancies. Read our extended interview with Gabby to find out more about her exercise routine, why she thinks exercising during pregnancy is so important, and how motherhood has changed her.

Loosen Up

Pregnancy can be a miraculous experience, but along with the joy come aches and pains. As your belly and breasts grow, you may start to feel stiff and sore, especially in your back and neck. "Gentle and supportive stretches relieve discomfort, boost circulation and increase your energy level," says Jennifer Gianni, certified Pilates instructor and creator of the DVD series Fusion Pilates for Pregnancy (fusionpilates.com).

Ski School

Ski-School

It's best to discuss this with your doctor. Here's why: In the first trimester, the fetus is well protected within the uterus, which in turn is safely tucked behind the pelvic bones. As such, if you were to suffer a hard fall or a blow to the abdomen from an errant ski, your baby would very likely be protected. However, after 13 weeks, the uterus begins to expand beyond the pelvis; this could put your baby at risk if you were to take a fall or get hit in the belly.

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