Safe Exercise For Pregnancy | Fit Pregnancy

Safe Exercise For Pregnancy

Off-Limit Activities

Off-Limit-Activities

"Scuba diving is a major no-no because of the oxygen considerations. With other activities, you need to weigh the benefits versus the potential risks," says Renee Jeffreys, M.S., an exercise physiologist in Cincinnati, and personal trainer with Fitness for Women (www.fitnessforwomenonline.com). After 15 weeks, the risks of falling and abdominal trauma become dangerous, so an aggressive game of basketball--where elbows are being thrown--wouldn't be a good idea.

Aquacizing

Aquacizing

It's better than OK: Swimming and other water-based activities are among the best things a pregnant woman can do for herself. Because you are suspended in water, the activity is easy on your joints and muscles, and you can maintain a fairly high level of intensity without straining, Downs says. Of course, you should feel comfortable in the water; if you're at all hesitant, use a flotation device and stay in the shallow end of the pool. Avoid water that's too hot or cold; a temperature between 80° F and 84° F is ideal.

Exercise Warning Signs

Exercise-Warning-Signs

Since the ligaments attached to your uterus are being stretched from all sides, don't be alarmed if you feel pulls and twinges in your groin, side or lower back while exercising or just going about your daily activities. It's also natural to feel more out of breath than usual--just back off the intensity a bit. But heed these warning signs: lightheadedness, contractions or cramping to the point of pain and bleeding. If you experience any of these, contact your doctor immediately.

Lifting Weights

Lifting-Weights

"Strength training is not only safe, it is actually very important during pregnancy," Shashoua says. "Women who stay fit and strong during pregnancy are able to get through the 1 to 3 hours of pushing that is sometimes required to deliver a baby better than those who aren't as strong," he explains. "It also helps women feel better about themselves." Regardless of her strength-training experience, a pregnant woman may initiate or continue a program, Shashoua adds.

Couch Potato Exercises

Couch-Potato-Exercises

Even if you have no favorite exercise from your past to offer inspiration, there's no time like the present to get off the couch and integrate motion into your life. Start by taking a 15- to 30-minute walk each day. If this sounds daunting, do what you need to make it a more attractive proposition--enlist a friend to join you or listen to a book on tape. If it still doesn't appeal to you, try swimming--it's one of the most beneficial activities for pregnant women. Also consider taking a prenatal exercise or yoga class.

Swimming

Swimming

While your aunt undoubtedly is thinking only of your best interests, swimming daily is a real gift to you and your unborn baby that poses no danger even as you approach your due date. If your water breaks while you are in the pool--or the bathtub, for that matter--you will feel the fluid leaking and should contact your doctor immediately. My real concern is that you take every precaution to steady yourself getting into and out of the pool or tub.

Pilates

Pilates

Pilates is a wonderful activity that you can continue throughout pregnancy with some modification. It offers gentle muscle strengthening while improving balance, which can be a real benefit as your body's shape and size evolves.

Sports and Exercise

Sports-and-Exercise

That may depend on your exercise intensity and workout goals. As long as you have a low-risk pregnancy with no contraindications, such as high blood pressure or symptoms of premature labor, exercise is good for you, and aiming for a target heart rate can help you work out at an appropriate level. While the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that pregnant women use the "talk test" when exercising (if you can talk normally, your heart rate is acceptable), in 2002 Canadian experts suggested utilizing target heart rates.

Fitpregnancy.com exclusive: Jessica's Workout

How the Fantastic One stays that way....

Actress Jessica Alba, appearing on the cover of Fit Pregnancy's June/July issue, was very close to delivering her first baby - and to her wedding with dad-to-be Cash Warren - when we spoke to her trainer, Ramona Braganza, creator of the "3-2-1 Workout." And Alba was still going strong. Here's how she stayed in such great shape before and during her pregnancy.

Gentle Exercise Best in First Trimester?

Moderate exercise is one of the best things a mom-to-be can do for herself. It's well known that regular leisure-time physical activity during pregnancy reduces the risk of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. But there may be one caveat. According to research on Danish women, strenuous exercise—especially intense, "jolting"-type activity—early in pregnancy may increase the risk of miscarriage.

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