Second Trimester | Fit Pregnancy

Second Trimester

Sugar Shock

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), or high blood sugar during pregnancy, used to be relatively rare, occurring in about 3 percent to 4 percent of pregnancies. But in recent years, the rate has doubled— now, up to 6 percent to 8 percent of moms-to-be are diagnosed with this prenatal complication. And new recommendations lowering the cutoff point for diagnosis may lead to an even more dramatic increase.

Childbirth Ed: The Online Option

We can’t Google our way through childbirth (yet), but we can study it online. Childbirth education covers anatomy, the birth process and pain management, and many people consider traditional classes, taken with other couples, a valuable pregnancy ritual. Others find them inconvenient and intimidating, preferring online courses. Here’s a snapshot:

THE PROS

Surgery While You're Pregnant

Surgery-While-Youre-Pregnant

It’s very unlikely, says Portland, Ore., OB-GYN Desiree Bley, M.D. To avoid risking miscarriage, we delay nonemergency surgeries until the second trimester. Although preterm labor is a risk then and later, it’s a treatable one. We prefer regional or local anesthesia to
general, but even the latter won’t harm the fetus.

 

Hand, foot and what?

Hand-foot-and-what

Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a viral infection that’s most common among young children. It typically causes a fever, painful sores in the mouth, and a red, blisterlike rash on the palms and soles but is usually not serious.

Red Blood Cells

Red-Blood-Cells

You could have iron-deficiency anemia. This condition affects up to one-third of all pregnant women and is usually harmless, according to Joanna Stone, M.D., associate professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive medicine at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York. Anemia is caused by an abnormally low concentration of red blood cells. These cells help carry hemoglobin, which in turn transports oxygen throughout the body; this explains why people who are anemic tend to feel fatigued and light-headed.

Leaking Fluid

Leaking-Fluid

Yes. At 16 weeks gestation, your body starts to produce colostrum; this is the earliest form of breast milk, and it’s brimming with anti-infective properties to protect your baby right from birth. Some women do leak small amounts during pregnancy, but that’s no problem. “There’s not a finite amount of colostrum,” Wight explains. “Your body will continue to produce it after your baby is born.”
 

Bloody annoying

Bloody-annoying

“Nosebleeds are a frequent occurrence among expectant women but are typically not something to worry about,” says San Diego OBGYN Suzanne Merrill-Nach, M.D. “We usually chalk them up to simply being an annoyance of pregnancy.

The Pregnancy Orgasm

When you’re expecting, the “Big O” can be so intense you might find it unnerving. Orgasm, and sometimes also intercourse, should be avoided if you have any risk factors for preterm labor or certain other pregnancy complications. And you shouldn’t have sex if your water has broken. Otherwise, going at it poses no dangers to you or your baby, says Stacey Rees, a certified nurse-midwife at Clementine Midwifery in Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Essential Oils

Since essential oils (the oils that give plants their distinctive smells) are the key ingredients in aromatherapy treatments and products, experts recommend not using them in the first trimester. Essential oils could cause uterine contractions or adversely affect your baby in his early developmental stages, explains Jill Edwards, N.D., an Oregon doctor of naturopathic medicine who specializes in prenatal care.

Page: