Third Trimester | Fit Pregnancy

Third Trimester

Power Positions

If your car stalled at the bottom of a hill, you certainly wouldn’t try to push it uphill. So why does it make sense to fight gravity by lying down during labor? This is just one reason why the standard hospital labor position—semi- or fully reclining—is not ideal. For one thing, when you’re lying on your back, your uterus compresses major blood vessels, potentially depriving the baby of oxygen and making you feel dizzy or queasy.

Why Counting Down to Your Due Date is a Bad Idea

I have two friends who are due at the end of August.  Both are first timers, healthy and had fairly easy pregnancies.  There’s been a little nausea here and there and a few aches and pains, but other than that they’ve both been really fortunate to have lovely pregnancies.  

Herpes and Delivery

Herpes-and-Delivery

Knowing your herpes simplex virus status makes you better prepared to deal with it. Many cases of neonatal transmission occur with mothers who don’t know they have the virus. Fortunately, while roughly 25 percent to 30 percent of pregnant women have herpes, less than 0.1 percent of babies contract it. Risk is increased if a woman has an outbreak at the time of delivery, because active viral cells present in the vagina can be very dangerous for her baby.

The Truth About Labor Pain

When Valerie Rowekamp’s labor started, it felt like an annoying case of menstrual cramps. During the hours that followed, the cramping became “downright uncomfortable, but not necessarily painful.” In fact, she gave birth without any pain medication. “I was surprised that it never really felt beyond my tolerance level, which is very low,” she said in her message on Fit Pregnancy’s Facebook page.

Your Busy Breasts

For some women, swollen and very tender breasts are the first clues they’re pregnant: Right from the start, they’re preparing for their job of producing milk. Here, Heather Weldon, M.D., an OB-GYN in Vancouver, Wash., answers some of the most common questions about your mammaries during pregnancy.

Q: How and when will my breasts change?

When Push Comes To Shove

While your birth experience will be as unique to you as your new baby, the phases of labor and delivery are the same for everyone. During pregnancy the opening of your uterus, the cervix, is firm and closed. As your due date approaches, you may experience mild contractions that help prepare your cervix for delivery: It becomes soft, stretchy and thin, a process called effacement.

Food Fixes

You may be hungrier than ever, but nausea, indigestion and the need to control your calorie intake can make it tough to get the nutrition you and your baby need. Our expert advice and satisfying recipes will help you overcome the challenges each trimester poses.
 

First Trimester

Delivery Room Drama

We all know that giving birth rarely happens like it does on TV shows: Your water breaks; you gasp, exclaim, “She’s coming!” Then, lipstick refreshed, you cradle your newborn as your handsome husband looks on. Alternatively, we hope your experience isn’t going to be fodder for reality TV: A swarm of doctors sprints into the delivery room, shouting, “Get the NICU team, STAT! We’ve got a quadruple nuchal and need a cold-knife section!”

Epidurals and Due Dates

It’s reader-question day. Patricia is six months pregnant with her first baby and has three great ones that a lot of women ask:

Does an epidural slow down labor? Does epidural medication reach the baby? I have a hunch I’m going to delivery early. Why doesn’t my doctor agree?

Allergy Avoidance

You'd probably do just about anything when you’re pregnant to keep your baby from developing food allergies. Avoid shrimp? Check. Stay away from eggs? No problem. Skip soy? Consider it done. Unfortunately, the advice on how to prevent food allergies keeps changing. So where does that leave you if someone offers you a peanut butter cookie?

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