Breast Milk Used as Treatment for Drug-Resistant Diseases

Breast milk helps baby grow, builds his immune system and more benefits—but a new study says breast milk could also combat certain antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Breast Milk Used as Treatment for Drug-Resistant Diseases Blaine Moats

As a new mom (or mom-to-be!) you already know how important breast milk is to your baby, regardless if you pump and bottle feed or breastfeed. Why? Breast milk helps baby grow, builds his immune system and so many more amazing benefits—but a new study says breast milk could also combat certain drug-resistant bacteria.

In the UK, the National Physical Laboratory and University College London concluded that a super small part of breast milk offers a protein, called lactoferrin, which could help fight dangerous illnesses that can't be helped with antibiotics. During an infant's first few months of life, this protein helps them stay well, too.

Adults need breast milk, too?

But now scientists have created a way for adults to also digest this protein to fight illness, and it's working. A student who worked on the project, Hasan Alkassem said: "The capsules acted as projectiles...with bullet speed and efficiency." In the future, they predict that this protein could cure sickle-cell disease, cystic fibrosis and Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

Talk about some amazing magic coming from your breasts!

Dame Sally Davies, the chief medical officer for England, said creating this vessel is a step in the right direction. She told the Times: "We need on average 10 new antibiotics every decade. If others do not work with us, it's not something we can sort on our own. This is a global problem. I am optimistic about this. The science is crackable. It's doable."

We can't wait to see what will come of the new studies around this drug and just how far breast milk can go to help not only babies, but everyone.

Related: Is Breast Milk the New Botox?

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